Citizen science project that started in 2012

Amateur astronomers have always made a significant contribution to the field of meteor astronomy from its earliest beginnings with visual observations.

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Community of amateur astronomers

UKMON is all about team work and collaboration, and having some fun along the way. It is a hobby after all, albeit one with very serious scientific intent.

Our core principle is the open sharing of data with meteor observers worldwide. When not busy on the day to day running of UKMON we are working hard to expand our network by encouraging others to join in. We have seen a huge amount of interest from the general public and have run some very successful social media campaigns via Facebook, Twitter and via our website. Our online meteor watch events have been hugely successful in generating public interest and we thoroughly enjoyed interacting with a global audience.

Science can be great fun!

Historic highlights

First UKMON meteor
meteor

First meteor across the channel

An ordinary meteor on 6 April 2012 at 03:08:36 captured over the Channel marks the birth of a network.

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St. Patric's Day fireball
fireball

First fireball seen by thousands

On 17 March 2016 thousands of people saw extremely bright fireball meteor. And UKMON captured it on camera.

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Image
meteorite

Winchcombe meteorite recovery

UKMON played a key part in a fast recovery of the ultra-rare Winchcombe meteorite. First one in the UK.

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Join UK Meteor Network
Get a camera

Working with:

International Meteor Organization

UKMON is working with the International Meteor Organization to gather public fireball meteor sightings. Public visual reports have significant importance.

www.imo.net
University of Bath

To help in its research of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs), the UKMON team reports any of these electrical phenomena directly to Dr Martin Fullekrug.

www.bath.ac.uk
Natural History Museum

Collaboration with Dr Ashley King and the Natural History Museum led to the successful recovery of the Winchcombe meteorite.

www.nhm.ac.uk
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