Saturday night's spectacular meteor over Lincolnshire


Fireball date: 30 March 2019 at 03:52:09 UT

Fireball ID: M20190330_035209


Eight UKMON cameras were triggered on Saturday morning 30 March 2019 at 03:52:09 UT and recorded a spectacular meteor over Lincolnshire, UK. Additionally, the same event was captured on our three SCAMP cameras.

UKMON stations that captured the event: Ash Vale, East Barnet, Loscoe, Loughborough, Wilcot and from two cameras at Tackley. SCAMP cameras that captured the event: MANCHESTER (30/03/2019 03:52:10 UTC) - EASTBARNET (30/03/2019 03:52:11 UTC) - CANTERBURY (30/03/2019 03:52:10 UTC).

Ash Vale

Only recorded start of the meteor through thick cloud.

 M20190330_035209 fireball from Ash Vale Camera

East Barnet

 M20190330_035209 fireball from East Barnet Camera

Loscoe

 M20190330_035209 fireball from Loscoe Camera

Loughborough

Recorded a flash, just outside the field of view.

Wilcot

 M20190330_035209 fireball from Wilcot Camera

Tackley

 M20190330_035209 fireball from Tackley Camera

 M20190330_035209 fireball from Tackley North Camera

SCAMP MANCHESTER:

 M20190330_035209 fireball from SCAMP MANCHESTER Camera

SCAMP EASTBARNET:

 M20190330_035209 fireball from SCAMP EASTBARNET Camera

SCAMP CANTERBURY:

 M20190330_035209 fireball from SCAMP CANTERBURY Camera

Alan Smith from Grundisburgh, Suffolk sent us his picture captured by Canon1100D, Sigma 4.5mm fisheye. F2.8. ISO800, 0351-0353 hrs (117 secs).

 M20190330_035209 fireball from Grundisburgh, Suffolk

Ground map

 M20190330_035209 fireball Ground map

Orbit

 M20190330_035209 fireball orbit

 M20190330_035209 fireball orbit

 M20190330_035209 fireball orbit

 M20190330_035209 fireball orbit

Conclusion

Under Q3 criteria the fireball M20190330_035209 is classified as an SPO (Sporadic type, not associated with any known meteor shower) and entered Earth’s atmosphere at speed of 23.6km/s. The beginning of ablation occurred at the height of 94.2km and ended at 49.4km above the ground. Meteor covered a ground distance of 72km. The absolute magnitude was -4.7.

 M20190330_035209 fireball fragmentation

There is an evident fragmentation of at the end end of the ablation. If we consider the relatively small entry speed and assuming origins of harder material from the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, we can assume that it’s quite probable some material has survived the journey through Earth’s atmosphere. UKMON team will investigate this meteor further.